Useful SQL Server DBCC Commands

DBCC PROCCACHE: Displays information about how the stored procedure cache is being used.

Example:

DBCC PROCCACHE

[6.5, 7.0, 2000]Updated 10-16-2005

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DBCC REINDEX: Periodically (weekly or monthly) perform a database reorganization on all the indexes on all the tables in your database. This will rebuild the indexes so that the data is no longer fragmented. Fragmented data can cause SQL Server to perform unnecessary data reads, slowing down SQL Server’s performance.

If you perform a reorganization on a table with a clustered index, any non-clustered indexes on that same table will automatically be rebuilt.

Database reorganizations can be done  byscheduling SQLMAINT.EXE to run using the SQL Server Agent, or if by running your own custom script via the SQL Server Agent (see below).

Unfortunately, the DBCC DBREINDEX command will not automatically rebuild all of the indexes on all the tables in a database; it can only work on one table at a time. But if you run the following script, you can index all the tables in a database with ease.

Example:

DBCC DBREINDEX(‘table_name’, fillfactor)

or

–Script to automatically reindex all tables in a database

USE DatabaseName –Enter the name of the database you want to reindex

DECLARE @TableName varchar(255)

DECLARE TableCursor CURSOR FOR
SELECT table_name FROM information_schema.tables
WHERE table_type = ‘base table’

OPEN TableCursor

FETCH NEXT FROM TableCursor INTO @TableName
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
PRINT “Reindexing ” + @TableName
DBCC DBREINDEX(@TableName,’ ‘,90)
FETCH NEXT FROM TableCursor INTO @TableName
END

CLOSE TableCursor

DEALLOCATE TableCursor

The script will automatically reindex every index in every table of any database you select, and provide a fillfactor of 90%. You can substitute any number you want for the 90 in the above script.

When DBCC DBREINDEX is used to rebuild indexes, keep in mind that as the indexes on a table are being rebuilt, that the table becomes unavailable for use by your users. For example, when a non-clustered index is rebuilt, a shared table lock is put on the table, preventing all but SELECT operations to be performed on it. When a clustered index is rebuilt, an exclusive table lock is put on the table, preventing any table access by your users. Because of this, you should only run this command when users don’t need access to the tables being reorganized. [7.0, 2000]Updated 10-16-2005

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DBCC SHOWCONTIG: Used to show how fragmented data and indexes are in a specified table. If data pages storing data or index information becomes fragmented, it takes more disk I/O to find and move the data to the SQL Server cache buffer, hurting performance. This command tells you how fragmented these data pages are. If you find that fragmentation is a problem, you can reindex the tables to eliminate the fragmentation. Note: this fragmentation is fragmentation of data pages within the SQL Server MDB file, not of the physical file itself.

Since this command requires you to know the ID of both the table and index being analyzed, you may want to run the following script so you don’t have to manually look up the table name ID number and the index ID number.

Example:

DBCC SHOWCONTIG (Table_id, IndexID)

Or:

–Script to identify table fragmentation

–Declare variables
DECLARE
@ID int,
@IndexID int,
@IndexName varchar(128)

–Set the table and index to be examined
SELECT @IndexName = ‘index_name’           –enter name of index
SET @ID = OBJECT_ID(‘table_name’)          –enter name of table

–Get the Index Values
SELECT @IndexID = IndID
FROM sysindexes
WHERE id = @ID AND name = @IndexName

–Display the fragmentation
DBCC SHOWCONTIG (@id, @IndexID)

While the DBCC SHOWCONTIG command provides several measurements, the key one is Scan Density. This figure should be as close to 100% as possible. If the scan density is less than 75%, then you may want to reindex the tables in your database. [6.5, 7.0, 2000] Updated 3-20-2006

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DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS: Used to find out the selectivity of an index. Generally speaking, the higher the selectivity of an index, the greater the likelihood it will be used by the query optimizer. You have to specify both the table name and the index name you want to find the statistics on.

Example:

DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS (table_name, index_name)

[7.0, 2000] Updated 3-20-2006

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