SQL Server Performance

Active Active Cluster hung & its effect on sqlsrvr

Discussion in 'SQL Server Clustering' started by ranjandba, Oct 20, 2005.

  1. ranjandba New Member

    1st Q - What are the options available to know if a box is in active/ active cluster or active / passive cluster configuration?

    2nd Q - I've active active cluster if the box is hung how this will effect my sqlserver services is that during this time my sqlserver services will be hung as well or it'll be failed to other node and will maintain the other tasks like scheduled jobs etc?

  2. satya Moderator

    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/bknight/clustering_a_sql_server_machine__2.asp

    Satya SKJ
    Moderator
    http://www.SQL-Server-Performance.Com/forum
    This posting is provided “AS IS” with no rights for the sake of knowledge sharing.
  3. mulhall New Member

    1 Look for evidence of one or two instances.

    2 "Hung"? If one node of a cluster does not respond to the heart beat, failover will occur.
  4. ranjandba New Member

    mullahll - what i need to check for evidence for one or two instance to find out if my server is in active active cluster or active passive cluster...
    When i see in cluadmin no where i see if my cluster configuration is active active or active passive could any one let me know is there any command or utility that wil let me know if the box is running under active active or active passive configuration ?

  5. Twan New Member

    you could get crude and just run task manager on both servers. if sqlserv.exe is running on both then it is in active/active, if not then it is in active/passive

    Cheers
    Twan
  6. Argyle New Member

    When you run cluadmin you see it by looking at the owner of the groups. If all SQL groups are running on one server it's currently in active/passive. If you have sql groups on both you are running active/active.
  7. mulhall New Member

    Look in the services applet on one of the nodes, you should see either:

    MSSQLSERVER$virtualnamehere1$

    or

    MSSQLSERVER$virtualnamehere1$
    MSSQLSERVER$virtualnamehere2$

    Kinda like any muliple instance SQL server.

    You should of course know this if you installed the servers, or the guys who did provided any documentation.

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