SQL Server Performance

Can network problem corrupt a database?

Discussion in 'SQL Server 2005 General DBA Questions' started by NewDBA, Apr 7, 2010.

  1. NewDBA Member

    I am wondering if network connectivity issues can cause corruption of the database.
  2. Luis Martin Moderator

    In my experience, no way. Wait for other members opinions.
  3. Adriaan New Member

    I don't see why not, to be honest - but that's just a gut feeling.
  4. MohammedU New Member

    I don't think so...
    Why would the network problem cause leads to corrupt db unless you are using .mdf and .ldf file as network files.
  5. Adriaan New Member

    Client apps may be handling stuff improperly, perhaps due to network problems. Perhaps a transaction initiated by the client side, that never gets committed or rolled back?
  6. rohit2900 Member

    Yeah its quite possible... One scenario which is coming into my mind is, suppose my database files are on SAN and connected via network and as expalined by Adriaan, if there is a network prob while running a large update or delete and this can lead data to be in an inconsistent state as the tran is neither committed or rollbacked.
  7. johro10 New Member

    I've actually seen this happen at a client site, the DB files (.mdf and .ldf) where on a SAN, and during a long running DML query, the network SAN device lost connectivity and corrupted the DBs. The recovery process was as follows, 1) Recover the network outage, 2) Restore DB's from backups. All in all, the client lost about 24 hours worth of data due this network outage that affected the DB's stored on SAN device.
  8. satya Moderator

    NewDBA,
    It certainly sounds like a classroom based question, but its an interesting question to ask.
    If you can enlighten what you mean by NETWORK problems then there are possibilities to clarify in detail, as above answers suggests that any communication to/from database server might cause the database a problem.
  9. moh_hassan20 New Member

    I think that network problems may lead to open transactions which may need to be resolved , but not corrupting database
  10. jrdevdba New Member

    Bump... I was thinking about the same thing. Except perhaps we can distinguish between two ways in which the term "corruption" is sometimes used: (1) bad data as a result of incomplete transactions and (2) physical corruption of the database files. I realize (1) is not good, but generally I think SQL Server recovers or rolls back what it can. I am somewhat more concerned with whether a network outage can result in physical corruption of the data files.

    It seems like moh_hassan20 provided the answer but I just want to make sure if anyone can kindly reply.

    Thanks for any help.

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