SQL Server Performance

Maximum Rows in SQL Server 2000?

Discussion in 'General DBA Questions' started by pjdolan, May 13, 2003.

  1. pjdolan New Member

    I understand that 1024 is the maximum number of columns in a SQL Server 2000 database.

    Is there a limit on the number of rows in a table? (or is it dependent on the hard-disk size).

    Many thanks.
  2. satya Moderator

    Its Limited by available storage, refer to BOL for Max.capacity specifications.

    _________
    Satya SKJ
  3. vbkenya New Member

    With a Maximum data file size of 32 TB, I am sure if you had the smallest table definiation ( 1 column, smallest data type) with no indexes, triggers, constraints, rules and other user-created objects(stored procedures, views etc) it would be possible to calculate the maximum number of row for this table and therefore SQL Server 2000.


    I think 'Limited by available storage' refers to the current limitations in available storage in the open affordable marketplace.

    There is a Max... I just haven't begun doing the arithmetic yet.


  4. vbkenya New Member

    With a Maximum data file size of 32 TB, I am sure if you had the smallest table definiation ( 1 column, smallest data type) with no indexes, triggers, constraints, rules and other user-created objects(stored procedures, views etc) it would be possible to calculate the maximum number of row for this table and therefore SQL Server 2000.


    I think 'Limited by available storage' refers to the current limitations in available storage in the open affordable marketplace.

    There is a Max... I just haven't begun doing the arithmetic yet.


  5. Chappy New Member

    Like satya says, the max DB size is quoted exactly in BOL as 1,048,516 TB^3. To derive a theoretical limit for number of rows, divide that value (in bytes) by 8192 to find the number of pages available. Then see how many rows would fit in a page (this of course assumes you only have one huge table!), and multiply this value by total pages available.<br /><br />Whether this value is then useful or not, is your decision <img src='/community/emoticons/emotion-5.gif' alt=';-)' /> I know that by the time my databases ever approach this size, 1,048,516 TB^3 will be a mere drop in the ocean <img src='/community/emoticons/emotion-1.gif' alt=':)' /><br />
  6. satya Moderator

    I don't think anybody crossed or achieved nearer to that 1,048,516 TB^3 figure for any setup.


    _________
    Satya SKJ

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