SQL Server Performance

Overcoing the bottleneck

Discussion in 'The Lighter Side of Being a DBA' started by xiebo2010cx, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. xiebo2010cx Member

    I have been learn/work on SQL Server area for around 9 months, recently it seems my knowledge reached a painful bottleneck, it is getting harder for me to advance...

    Ideas, insigh? Gurus



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  2. Luis Martin Moderator

    In what area?


    Luis Martin
    Moderator
    SQL-Server-Performance.com

    All in Love is Fair
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  3. xiebo2010cx Member

    My goal is becoming a big SQL Server player, both administration and development.



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  4. Luis Martin Moderator

    Did you read Karen Delany book?. Is a good one.


    Luis Martin
    Moderator
    SQL-Server-Performance.com

    All in Love is Fair
    Stevie Wonder


    All postings are provided “AS IS” with no warranties for accuracy.



  5. xiebo2010cx Member

    I selectively(80%) read inside 2000 before, currently I am carefully reading inside 2005 (T-SQL querying and T-SQL programming from Itzik Ben-Gan ), thanks Luis.



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  6. FrankKalis Moderator

    I think that's a quite natural effect you observe. In economics it's called the "law of diminishing (marginal) returns". You have read about some content before and when you read about the same in another source it all sounds familiar and not much of that seems to be new. However, I think that is a mistake. You say you work with SQL Server for about 9 month. That's a _very_ short time. I work with SQL Server for about 8 years and learn something new almost each day. The basics should be pretty clear, but this or that nuance deepens your understanding. And once you think you're familiar with this or that concept, you can start to look over the rim of your coffee-cup and start to ask yourself, how other system solve things or why things work the way they do. And by asking this yourself, you gain really a lot. So, to cut a long story short: SQL Server (and relational databases in general) are a never-ending learning process. There might be twists on the way, but the learning process, ideally, never ends. [<img src='/community/emoticons/emotion-1.gif' alt=':)' />]<br /><br />--<br />Frank Kalis<br />Moderator<br />Microsoft SQL Server MVP<br />Webmaster:<a target="_blank" href=http://www.insidesql.de>http://www.insidesql.de</a>
  7. xiebo2010cx Member

    Thanks, Frank. I totally agree with you that SQL Server is a non-ending learning process.





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  8. mmarovic Active Member

    In addition to Frank's comments, I had 3 sources for expanding my sql server knowledge.

    1. Documentation (BOL), books and articles.
    2. On the job experience: solving different tasks for years, exploring documentation and articles and testing ideas before implementing them. Also, monitoring the effects when implementation is applied in prod environment and comparing with baseline when available.
    3. This forum gave me opportunity to think about solution of problems I didn't have opportunity to solve on work and also to learn from experience of peers.
  9. satya Moderator

    I beleive knowledge sharing is the best thing where you will learn quickly, like using forums and newsgroups.
    In general you might not spare time to read a 400+ page book for a specific subject, whereas if you can take time by referring to forums and newsgroup questions then it will give some idea to search thru the BOl and other web related resources to answer.

    What you say is your knowledge to a bottleneck, can you explain this a bit more keeping the day to day job activites at your work place.

    Satya SKJ
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Contributing Editor & Forums Moderator
    http://www.SQL-Server-Performance.Com
    This posting is provided AS IS with no rights for the sake of knowledge sharing.
  10. Roji. P. Thomas New Member

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by FrankKalis</i><br /><br />I think that's a quite natural effect you observe. In economics it's called the "law of diminishing (marginal) returns". <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"><br /><br />“Did you ever think that making a speech on economics is a lot like pissing down your leg? It seems hot to you, but it never does to anyone else.”<br />Lyndon B. Johnson <br /><br />[<img src='/community/emoticons/emotion-1.gif' alt=':)' />]<br /><br />Roji. P. Thomas<br /<a target="_blank" href=http://toponewithties.blogspot.com>http://toponewithties.blogspot.com</a><br />

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