SQL Server Performance

SQL Standards

Discussion in 'EditorsBlog' started by shanetasker, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. shanetasker New Member

    SQL is a programming language that has been standardised by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and also the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The problem is that although the SQL language has been standardised, it is really up to the individual DMBS vendor as to whether they adopt the standards or not. DBMS vendors are also free to add their own extensions to the language that are not part of the standards.
    Over the weekend I was writing report specifications to interface with a very popular accounting package and I was using Microsoft Access (I know what you are thinking) to review the schema to define the requirements that could be handed over to a report writer. In doing this I needed to write some SQL statements to present the data. In order to write a simple SELECT statement to do this I must have spent about 20 minutes in order to work out what the specific syntax was to return the desired date format. Even though Access and SQL Server are both Microsoft products they do not even have the same SQL syntax. So what chance is there that other DBMS vendors will adopt a consistent syntax at least for the basic operations?
    - Peter Ward
  2. bagsha New Member

    Hi PeterYes, the syntax differences can be a bugger. One thing that will help is if you set your Access database to use ANSI 92 compatible syntax then you can use standard SQL statements and functions. Set this from Tools/Options...Tables/Queries tab...SQL Server Compatible Syntax (ANSI 92)...tick a boxSee ya soon,Shaun
  3. Anonymous New Member

    SQL is a programming language that has been standardised by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and also the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The problem is that although the SQL language has been standardised, it is really up to the individual DMBS vendor as to whether they adopt the standards or not. DBMS vendors are also free to add their own extensions to the language that are not part of the standards.
  4. jimpen New Member

    Granted that is a standard -- but having worked with SQL Server, Oracle, Sybase, Access/JET you learn quickly that about the only thing consistent is the base. But many of the extensions cover things that would hamstring most RDBM systems if the creator didn't have them. The quickest that comes to mind is the VarChar extension. The amount of space they save by themselves is enormous.

Share This Page