SQL Server Performance

Which server?

Discussion in 'Performance Tuning for Hardware Configurations' started by Will192, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. Will192 New Member

    We are buying a new server. We run SQL server 2000, Win2000 and will run two web applications that will both hit SQL server.

    Which system would be better?

    Quad 3.66ghz w/1mb Cache per chip and 8GB ram

    or

    Quad 3.33ghz w/8mb Cache per chip and 4GB ram


    Both web apps will hit the server in short bursts, not very many long running queries. About 150-200 users total. After the page is loaded, it disconnects from the server, so there won't be too many users ever logged in at the same time.

    Thanks in advance for any responses to this post.

    Live to Throw
    Throw to Live
  2. Luis Martin Moderator

    What SQL 2000 version are you planning to install?

    Luis Martin
    Moderator
    SQL-Server-Performance.com

    One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important
    Bertrand Russell


    All postings are provided “AS IS” with no warranties for accuracy.



  3. deepakontheweb New Member



    For short running queries and fast response, If I have to choose..will go for: -

    Quad 3.33ghz w/8mb Cache per chip and 4GB ram

    BTW what SQL edition you have??

    Deepak Kumar

    --An eye for an eye and everyone shall be blind
  4. Will192 New Member

    We will be running SQL 2000 with Win2000.

    I just got more info - the quad 3.66 costs $14K and the quad 3.33 costs $20K. Most of our queries will hit larger tables (1 to 2gb) and return a small number of rows.

    Is the extra $7k worth the extra memory on the processors? Will I see a definite performace increase with the 3.33ghz chips?


    Live to Throw
    Throw to Live
  5. satya Moderator

    If you're using SQL standard edition than more than 2GB is not supported, only Enterprise Editions has this facility to addup more physical memory for optimum performance when running resource intensive queries.

    Anyways you can collect PERFMON counters for physical disk, memory, processor, process and SQL memory etc. counters for further assessment.

    Satya SKJ
    Moderator
    http://www.SQL-Server-Performance.Com/forum
    This posting is provided “AS IS” with no rights for the sake of knowledge sharing.
  6. Luis Martin Moderator

    The question about SQL 2000 edition is because whith SQL 2000 Stanadard you can reach up to 2GB and with SQL 2000 Enterprise Edition you can reach up to 8 GB with Windows 2000 Advanced Server.


    Luis Martin
    Moderator
    SQL-Server-Performance.com

    One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important
    Bertrand Russell


    All postings are provided “AS IS” with no warranties for accuracy.



  7. Will192 New Member

    Enterprise Edition, sorry didn't understand the question.

    Live to Throw
    Throw to Live
  8. derrickleggett New Member

    What level cache on each of these chips? Also, what's the rest of the server like (bus speed, drives, RAID Controller, etc)?

    MeanOldDBA
    derrickleggett@hotmail.com

    When life gives you a lemon, fire the DBA.
  9. Will192 New Member

    As far as I know, all the other specs on the server are the same. I think that the chips are the same except for the speed and the amount of cache. I will get more info.

    Live to Throw
    Throw to Live
  10. joechang New Member

    if you want a high volume of efficient queries, say average CPU < 30ms, then the big cache helps, even if slightly lower frequency
    other you want to do big giant DW queries, then go for the higher clock speed, even if cache is smaller

Share This Page